The Library of Sporting Equipment: Sharing Economy for Better Health

The Library of Sporting Equipment: Sharing Economy for Better Health

How can we increase neighbourhood health by making use of open data? That was the main question last week when I participated in a weekend-long hackathon for health at Experiolab. Aiming to improve the public health of Kronoparken, a modernist neighbourhood in Karlstad, Sweden, we came together with a range of (local) experts and local citizens and went to work.

How to Build an Outdoor Fitness Park

How to Build an Outdoor Fitness Park

Having designed several outdoor fitness parks, I present here a few steps to create a successful outdoor gym. As an example, I take the case of the Oosterkade, a fitness Park in Groningen, the Netherlands. We have designed it this year, and it's been attracting many users every day, throughout the day. The lessons learned from creating this park can help you plan a better park in your city. So, let's move

Guest Post: Porto struggles to seize long-term residents in its beautiful but vacant city center

Guest Post: Porto struggles to seize long-term residents in its beautiful but vacant city center

Porto is a city with convenient transit, stretching river, sandy beach, pleasant summer, beautiful architecture, and abundant green space. An ideal vacation spot, the city has been attracting millions of tourists ever since tourism-driven development started to emerge within the past five years. However, a short stroll along Porto’s historic center would reveal a different story: many residential houses remain under-maintained and abandoned in the most desirable locations. While the city gains international popularity, its own residents do not seem to find home at the heart of Porto.

The Air Pollution Paradox: How Amsterdam Punishes Its Residents Twice

The Air Pollution Paradox: How Amsterdam Punishes Its Residents Twice

Amsterdam, a city ranking high in sustainability indexes, is home to a new initiative: The TreeWiFi. The young startup behind the initiative has hung a bunch of birdhouses around the city that provide their surroundings with free wifi internet access. However, when air pollution around a treehouse exceeds a predefined limit, the internet access is turned on. The founder of the project hopes that these treehouses will reduce air pollution in the Dutch capital.

An Urbanized World: Should We Put All Our Eggs In The Urban Basket?

An Urbanized World: Should We Put All Our Eggs In The Urban Basket?

Urbanization, the growing share of people living in urban areas, is often used as an argument for tackling societal problems in an urban context (read: cities). Here in Sweden, for instance, 85% of the population is living in urban areas. And although Sweden has an exceptionally high urban population, high rates of urban dwellers are not uncommon, as globally more than half of the people live in urban areas.

It's the Design Guide, Stupid - American vs. Dutch Cycling Infrastructure

It's the Design Guide, Stupid - American vs. Dutch Cycling Infrastructure

There are many myths explaining why so many people in the Netherlands cycle. I have heard it all: from explanations relating to altitude and elevations (“The Netherlands is flat”) to analyses of the Dutch genetic form (“They are more suitable to cycling”). I’ve even heard that the Dutch prefer the bicycle over the car because they are so damn cheap.

Of course these stories are nonsense. The 21th century Dutch cycles because the Netherlands is home to great, complete and safe infrastructure. While other countries keep making the same excuses for not becoming a cycling heaven, the Dutch just build better infrastructure. And while some nations, like the Danes, successfully follow the Dutch model: providing safe paths for cyclists, others don’t quite do so.

Twenty Meters in Eleven Minutes: Anti-Pedestrian Planning in Warsaw

Twenty Meters in Eleven Minutes: Anti-Pedestrian Planning in Warsaw

“Absurdity in the middle of the city. I have to overcome the distance of 20 meters, and it takes me more than 11 minutes”. That’s how Anna, a young woman from Warsaw, described on Facebook her last week’s experience. She uploaded a video showing how she tries to cross a street in the city. And it wasn't as easy as it should be.

9 Urban and Regional Planning Summer Schools in Europe (2016)

9 Urban and Regional Planning Summer Schools in Europe (2016)

It is becoming some sort of tradition, the LVBLCITY list of urban/regional planning summer schools in Europe. Also this year, there are many interesting summer schools across the continent, and the deadlines of many of them are approaching. This list does not contain all the courses out there, but is rather a selection of courses that we at LVBLCITY find particularly interesting.

How Can You Visit Your Parents If You Don’t Have a Car?

How Can You Visit Your Parents If You Don’t Have a Car?

Urban and transport planners who are concerned with the negative environmental impact of travelling have been advocating for policies that achieve three basic goals: shortening travel distances, lowering travel frequency, and reducing car use. For example, by planning dense urban neighbourhoods with amenities within walking distance, the need for long car journeys is reduced. The question I asked in my research was whether these policy goals are relevant when it comes to an important activity which planners hardly pay attention to: staying in touch with family.

Woonerf: Inclusive and Livable Dutch Street

Woonerf: Inclusive and Livable Dutch Street

In the study tours I give in Groningen, the Netherlands, I always make sure to stop at a certain neighborhood that every urbanist can appreciate. The neighborhood in question is called Hortusbuurt, located right outside the historical city center, and dates back to the 17th century. The reason I like showing the neighborhood is mainly because of the variety of woonerven it accommodates.  What are woonerven you ask? The following post is a short description of the concept, history and critique.

People First: Impressions from the Canadians’ Visit to Groningen

People First: Impressions from the Canadians’ Visit to Groningen

Weeks before the general capitulation of Germany on 8 May 1945, Canadian forces entered and liberated the eastern and northern parts of the Netherlands from the German forces. One of the liberated cities was Groningen, after the Canadiens defeated the Nazi forces during the Battle of Groningen between April 13 and 16, 1945. The Canadians must have a warm place in Groningen's heart.

How Would You Like to Move in Your City?

How Would You Like to Move in Your City?

We would like to share with you a project we’ve been working on during the past few weeks. It’s called How would you like to move? (Hoe Wil Jij Bewegen? in Dutch), and it aims at inspiring locals to sport (more) in the public space, as well as to get feedback from them about how they are using the public space of the city to sport. How Would You Like to Move? is part of Groningen municipality’s bigger project: The Moving City (De Bewegende Stad). The project objective is to make Groningen a better place to be active in, both by physical interventions and communication.